GPS jammers protect military secrets

GPS jammers are used for civilian and military applications

GPS Jammer is designed for area and assets protection against satellite navigated threats like GPS guided missiles. The SCL-APSNT can also be used against low flying UAVs to prevent reconnaissance of important place. GPS portable jammer can be effectively used in combat situations for eliminating satellite navigated guided weapon systems, missiles and ground/airborne threats It is designed to operate on all satellite navigation system available today or in the near future including GPS, GPS II, GALILEO and GLONASS at different power levels. It is upgradable to operate on COMPASS. (SCL-APSNT) provides protection ranges from 30 Km to 150 Km depending on the power output of the jammer and the envisaged region of coverage.

GPS signals make use of a definite and specific frequency. GPS works at two main frequencies. The one is intended for non-military or public use at 1575.42 MHz and the other one is meant for military purpose at 1227.6 MHz. Actually, GPS is based on radio waves.

Overall, using the GPS can be very useful, such as car navigation, finding missing persons and navigating in the sea. Even so, there are many different ways to misuse the GPS, and that is why we have the GPS jammers.

For a radio jammer to work, it needs to be fairly close to the signal its crew wants to disrupt. The Avtobaza, for one, can detect targets up to 93 miles away, according to Air Power Australia, an independent think tank specializing in military electronic systems. Jamming requires more power than detecting does, so the range at which the Avtobaza can disrupt a drone is certainly shorter than 90 miles.

That’s why Russia’s 4G jammer, and the new counter-drone «special forces» that operate them, don’t necessarily pose an existential risk to the US military’s UAVs. The Russian drone-hunters could struggle to pinpoint targets. «It would seem to be hard to do unless you knew where they were going to be and when,» one former US drone-developer explained on condition of anonymity.

Air Force Col. John Dorrian, a spokesman for Combined Joint Task Force-Operation Inherent Resolve, would only describe the devices given to the Iraqis as «jammers.» Dorrian has previously said that U.S forces advising and training the Iraqis have their own jammers to counter drones.

Richard Langley, a professor of geodesy at the University of New Brunswick in Canada, said the jammers would also have a hard time interfering with an encrypted military GPS code broadcast at a frequency of 1227.6 MHz. But the jammers could interfere with signals broadcast at 1575.42 MHz, a band used by commercial GPS receivers. Such receivers could have been bought by individual troops, but the Army tried to derail that practice in January.

Gun drone jammer

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